depth

I love this colour. I cannot decide if it’s mulberry or burgundy or something else entirely, but there is something very unusual about it that I like.

A year ago I read in the interview with Pat McGrath in which she explained how she created the look for Rooney Mara’s Lisbeth Salander in David Fincher’s The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. I really liked Mara’s transformation for this role, even if I wasn’t exactly excited for the film itself. McGrath explained how they wanted to create a smoky eye for Lisbeth, but instead of going the obvious route and piling on black eyeliner, she opted for something more translucent and interesting by creating a shade that contained a bit of red pigment and was transparent so that it allowed natural skin tone trough.

A couple of days after reading that interview, I was in Sephora (I just discovered something called BB cream and wanted one but couldn’t decide on a brand and still haven’t to this day) when I stumbled upon this eyeshadow compact containing an unusual mulberry colour. I decided, almost contra-intuitivly, to just add it to my shopping basket. It’s been a while since I really experimented with new make-up, but every now and then something comes along that just feels exciting. At home I tried it on and after mixing and matching with other colours, I fell in love with the way it made my eyes brighter and intenser, without looking like I was suffering from pinkeye. The trick is to keep it light and blend really well.

I wore this one or two times in the evening, but soon went back to my usual neutrals, since they are more fool-proof and easier to apply (and sometimes I’m really lazy when it comes to things like make-up, even though I like the idea of using it).

Then last summer Emily from IntoTheGloss published these images of Meghan Collison wearing her “obsession of the (coming) season: Clé de Peau (which I wish was available here)’s limited-edition Satin Eye Color  – “a wash of a hard-to-place, hazy color (…) It’s not in the crease…it’s not “smoky” in the typical way…it’s like a smoke of sexy vampire colorIt’s so…fresh.“. I immediately wanted this (how can I not?). Then remembered owning something similar.

Since then it has grown into a full-blown love-affair. I really love the way this colour looks with simple and luxurious dark grey wool garments and it somehow feels much more wearable than wearing deep lipcolours. As much as I like perfect deep berries on lips, they do need perfect application-skills and multiple check-ups and fixes, thus being less practical and eventually less effortless. (For these reasons, when it comes to lips, I’m much more of a lip stain person.)

I brought this compact with me on my trip last month, but as you can see in the picture, it arrived back home in tiny pieces. Might be a time for a replacement.

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contraries

There are certain parallels to be drawn between the current so-called minimalist movement (which can be interpreted as a reaction to the opulence and ornamental nature of fashion on the majority of blogs on the internet) and the sans-coulottes of French Revolution. Both contain a form of criticism, weather intentional or not, towards their extravagant contemporaries, questioning the responsibility and appropriateness of blatant consumerism they are promoting.

(The excerpt above is from the new issue of Dapper Dan magazine, written by Ilias Marmaras.)

charcoal


I’m currently living in my grey wool coat and black leather ankle boots.
Away from home my wardrobe was limited, which was something I really enjoyed. My favourite pieces became the ones with the least amount of colour and detail, like the small, leather crossover bag that lets your hands move freely, dark grey jeans and black cashmere or wool crewneck sweater. Simple and utilitarian. I am slowly moving away from navy and into the shades of charcoal.

“Why A Man Should Be Well-Dressed”


I’m back from the working holiday in south of Europe, where I was wearing t-shirts untill 2 weeks ago due to the 30 C weather. Then suddenly it became winter and just as the first snow arrived, I hopped the plane that took me back home.

One of the books I read in my time away from home was Adolf Loos’ Why A Man Should Be Well-Dressed. Adolf Loos was an architect and a strong opposer of the ornamental Art Deco movement at the time. This small book was written around the turn of the century Vienna, and it’s very telling of those times in history. Nonetheless, his view of the uniform dressing as opposed to ornamental dressing is very much relevant today and worth reading if you’re interested in such matters.