Intimacy

“Wearing pajamas in public is taking a symbol of private life into the public sphere. Not actual private life, mind you, but the symbol of it. (…) The pajama-pants look as a trend isn’t just about comfort, or even just about bringing our private lives outside. It’s about a careful calibration of public intimacy. It’s about what layers you’re going to show, and when, and to whom. Actually, it’s about Facebook. The generation that’s donning loungewear in public in large numbers is also the generation that has grown up with different expectations of privacy and public living. (…) It only makes sense that a generation versed in managing privacy would gravitate toward clothing that advertises different layers of public and private personae. (…) Part of what makes us us is what we keep to ourselves. Likewise, part of what creates intimacy is sharing private parts of ourselves with others. So when the expectations of what’s public and what’s private shift dramatically, so do our ideas of intimacy and how we can best create it. “
Excepts from the article “The Privacy Settings of Pajamas” from The Beheld, found via Final Fashion.

The current surge of pajamas as day or evening wear is fascinating to me. As with any new fascinations which might end up resulting in future wardrobe additions, it’s a toss up between giving in to a fascination and the practical realization that I don’t really need a new item in my wardrobe. 

Luxury pyjamas posses many of the qualities I personally find appealing: comfortable, well-made and (usually) flattering. There is also that elusive androgyny as they reference men’s pyjamas (and the men’s suit, originally), and leisurely decadence. Plus they go from practical to frivolous just by switching the context. Furthermore, if you end up regretting the purchase down the road, you can always end up using them to oh, I don’t know …sleep in?

As of now, though, this trend might just be something I’ll admire from a distance, but I will stock up on all those beautiful sets currently available. (And who knows, I might just end up tossing a matching cardigan over my shoulders, grabbing a clutch bag and velvet slippers for a dinner with friends downtown.)


(top image from Vogue UK via littlelovered tumblr; bottom image clockwise from top left: Equipment pyjama set via Net-A-Porter, Stella McCartney s/s 2012, Sofia Coppola in Louis Vuitton s/s resort 2012 via Rdujour, Marion Cotillard via littlelovered tumblr, Jane Fonda via unknown tumblr)

Oeuvre in Pink


(images via various tumblers over the years, which i forgot the name of. apologies)

Not only does Sofia Coppola exude style, her work as a director is at least as inspirational. Her films such as Lost in Translation and Marie Antoinette tell of the essence and loneliness of being a female in a world that, as one critic put it “knows how to use you, but doesn’t know what to do with you.” There is a quiet, naturalistic melancholy that surrounds it, even in her elaborate costumedrama based on the teenage French queen.

Every once in a while I’ll spend my evening with her movies and a big cup of camommile tea. They also make for perfect movies for sleepovers, with additional wine and macarons highly recommended.